Cate Blanchett explains lack of female directors in competition

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"Black Panther" director Ryan Coogler - whose film is breaking box office records - is also likely to tackle the lack of black faces in Hollywood in a Cannes masterclass.

But that "doesn't mean we have to condemn them" as artists, he added.

She made her breakthrough as Britain's flame-haired monarch Elizabeth I in the 1998 biopic, earning her the first of her six Oscar nominations.

On the cusp of the 71st Cannes, which begins Tuesday with the premiere of Asghar Farhadi's Everybody Knows, with Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem, Chastain's piercing criticism still hovers over a festival that finds itself, unlike it has in decades, in tumult.

The 48-year-old Melbourne-born actress noted there were "several women in competition" at this year's festival.

The event boss Thierry Fremaux has confirmed that 100 women will make their way down the famous carpet as part of a symbolic gesture to "affirm their presence" following the sexual harassment scandal that has swept across Hollywood in the previous months.

Fremaux asserted that the festival is doing its best to improve the gender ratio in its selections and committees.

Australian actress Blanchett said it will take time to ensure gender parity in the film industry.

Local girl earns Girl Scout Gold Award
But it all changed for her in October when Boy Scouts of America (BSA) announced it was opening up its Cub Scout program to girls. For over twenty-five years, girls have been a part of BSA's co-ed Venturing, Exploring, and Sea Scouts programs.

The two-time Oscar victor also gave short shrift to a journalist who suggested the festival's traditions of glitz and glamour were at odds with the current mood. I am humbled by the privilege and responsibility of presiding over this year's jury. But that did not stop the Oscar victor from delivering the kind of deft, articulate responses that proved her the ideal leader-no offense, Cannes director Thierry Frémaux-to guide the flawed French festival through its Time's Up-era evolution. According to Ms. Blanchett, profound and lasting impact can happen through raising specific issues than mere "generalisations and pontifications".

"Being attractive doesn't preclude being intelligent".

DuVernay, the filmmaker of "Selma" and the Netflix documentary "13th", said that the power of movies is the ability to "speak to each other through cinema". There was something outside of my purview to orient me to my place in the world.

Cannes never mentions the country of origin while listing the films.

Despite a plea by USA director Oliver Stone and other supporters, Tehran has refused to lift a travel ban on the dissident Iranian master Jafar Panahi, whose "Three Faces" is in the running for the Palme d'Or.

Labaki, one of Lebanon's most famed filmmakers whose Where Do We Go Now? played in Cannes' Un Certain Regard section, has spent the last two years making Capernaum, a realistic rendering of the lives of Syrian migrant children, with nonprofessional actors playing version of themselves.

Amidst the less starry line-up at the festival, the new "Star Wars" spin-off, "Solo" is the only Hollywood blockbuster.

Pointedly though, he has not risked giving von Trier a press conference this time for his new serial killer flick, "The House That Jack Built" with Uma Thurman and Matt Dillon.

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