Shooting at Los Angeles Middle School an Accident, Police Say


Police guard a roadblock to Salvadore Castro Middle School in Los Angeles, California on February 1, 2018, where two students were wounded, one critically, in a school shooting.

"Someone made a decision to bring a gun, I guess someone was accidentally playing around with it", 12-year-old Benjamin said.

It was not immediately known how the shooter was able to get the gun on campus, Bernal said, noting that the school conducts random weapon checks.

The single round struck a 15-year-old boy in the temple and a 15-year-old girl in the wrist. Both victims are 15 years old.

A 15-year-old boy was shot in the head but doctors say he'll recover. She had seen news of the shooting on TV and came to get her daughter, who is a student at the middle school.

A student at a Los Angeles middle school says a 12-year-old girl who allegedly shot classmates told him it was an accident.

Emergency personnel from several agencies responded to the middle school, located in the 1500 block of West Second Street, after receiving reports of a possible shooting inside a classroom shortly before 9 a.m., according to Los Angeles School Police Department Chief Steven Zipperman.

Hernandez left work and sped to the school campus.

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"As an older brother you wouldn't like your little sister to be in this type of situation, you know", he said.

At the front gate of the school, McNair said she was directed to the back, which was blocked off.

Police received a call of a shooting at approximately 4 a.m. near 29th Street and Western Avenue, where the victim was found dead on the driver's side of a vehicle. A month later, a student died from a shooting at Reseda High School.

The girl carried the handgun in her backpack which accidentally "went off" on Thursday, leading to a shooting in a classroom that eventually injured five.

Arcos said that the 12-year-old has an attorney and is not talking to investigators.

The enrollment is 92 percent Latino, and most students are from low-income families.

Los Angeles police kept parents updated on Twitter and in a meeting outside the school, telling them if they had not heard from their child they should assume they were safe and well.

The district has a policy which states random searches should be carried out daily with a metal detector wand.