Why the Geminids Are the Best Meteor Shower of 2017

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While there will be fewer meteors Wednesday evening prior to the peak hours, the ones that do show are likely to be more spectacular, making longer streaks against the sky as they skim the atmosphere.

They exist, and a big one is approaching Earth this week. Moreover, this unusual object is the parent of the annual Geminid meteor shower, which is also coming this week. What makes it interesting is the fact that these places will not only be great for witnessing the Geminid Meteor Shower but will also prove to be great winter destinations to vacation at! Frank Schomp captured a meteor streaking across the night sky on December 2, 2017. A helpful tip from Sky and Telescope Magazine: you don't need to focus on, or even find, the radiant of a meteor shower in order to see them. "The darker the night sky, the better", he added.

"So, it's a possibility that this could be a really dynamite show this year", U.S. Naval Observatory Astronomer Geoff Chester said.

What sets the Geminids apart from other meteor showers is their point of origin.

"The meteor shower activity varies from year to year, and it is often a complicated matter to predict how lovely a shower will be".

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Things do improve in the early hours of the morning which could mean that you have a flawless window within which to catch a glimpse of the phenomenon without getting completely soaked.

But the best view will be away from city lights. They also suggest to give your eyes about 20 minutes to adapt to the dark for optimal viewing.

Taking its name from the region in the sky where it usually appears (Gemini constellation) the Geminids are renowned for being some of the brightest and most active in the stargazing calendar.

Compare the times of year when the Geminid (December) and Persied (August) meteor showers occur and it may be clear why it seems more people are familiar with the Persieds.

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