HDMI 2.1 is finally here, and it has support for 10K resolution

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The HDMI Forum released their specifications for HDMI 2.1 earlier this year, but have now tightened them and make them official. The new spec includes support for resolutions up to 10K (10240x4320) at refresh rates up to 120 Hz. Dynamic HDR formats are also supported. This cable will ensure users can properly display bandwidth reliant content, like 8K with HDR enabled. It features exceptionally low EMI (electro-magnetic interference) which reduces interference with nearby wireless devices. The cable is backward compatible and can be used with the existing installed base of HDMI devices.

With the release of the Apple TV 4K and the proliferation of cheap 4K television sets, consumers may now just be getting used to the idea of 4K resolution, but the folks behind the HDMI spec continue to help push display technology forward. Resolutions up to 10K are also supported for commercial AV, and industrial and specialty usages.

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The new standard has a hugely increased bandwidth of 48Gbps - more than doubling the ability of the previous (2.0) version, which allowed 18Gbps.

HDMI 2.1 also comes with eARC (Enhanced Audio Return Channel) support which supports most advanced audio formats such as Dolby Atmos and DTS X and provides a lossless audio experience compared to HDMI 2.0's ARC feature. Gamers will be interested in Variable Refresh Rate-essentially a standardized version of Nvidia's G-Sync and AMD's Freesync (which is itself a standardized feature of the DisplayPort connection standard), which alters the refresh rate on the fly to match the rate at which frames are produced by the GPU-and Quick Frame Transport, which somehow reduces the latency of the HDMI connection. Quick Media Switching support is there for movies and video to eliminate the delay that can cause blank screens to appear before content is displayed. An Auto Low Latency mode allows source units to establish the ideal latency settings for different types of media, too. HDMI Licensing Administrator, Inc.

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