Military Staff Removed From White House After 'Incident' On Trump's Asia Trip

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Multiple military personnel have been removed from their positions in the White House after allegedly having improper contact with foreign women during President Trump's recent trip to Asia, according to a new report.

In what can now officially be deemed a trend, three Army officers have been reassigned from their White House posts amid an investigation into what exactly they were doing with a group of "foreign women" during their stopover in Vietnam with President Donald Trump.

"We are aware of the incident, and it is now under investigation", Department of Defense spokesman Mark Wright said.

Read the whole story from The Hill.

She said she was not aware of the final conclusions or disciplinary action.

"We are aware of the incident and it is now under investigation", Air Force spokesman Col. Patrick S. Ryder said then.

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If the three members are found guilty, they might be subjected to court martial or administrative discipline along with possibly losing their security clearances.

According to officials, the accused, who were senior members of the service were sent back to the USA and they were then removed from their respective White House positions. The communications agency employs 1,200 staffers drawn from all branches of the military.

Ten Secret Service agents were fired in 2012 after being accused of taking prostitutes to their hotel rooms while working in advance of a trip by Barack Obama to Colombia.

Spokesmen for Trump and Pence declined to comment and referred questions to the office of Defense Secretary Jim Mattis. Many of its personnel are assigned to White House duties on four-year tours. "The secret service takes all allegations of misconduct seriously".

The incident happened when the US security services were preparing for former President Barack Obama's visit to Cartagena, Colombia. In his testimony before Congress, then-Secret Service director Mark Sullivan said that while the situation was humiliating, there was never any risk to the president.

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